Thinking PBL, Explanations, & Search Literacy

Steven Anderson

Steven Anderson

In my series at Connect Learning Today, I explore a few things that I have seen, or heard that are pushing my thinking, getting me to see something in a different way, or just something I want to share. This week I have 3 things that I’ve been sharing on Twitter and thinking about.

Practical PBL-The Challenges of Ongoing Assessment: There are multiple resources available for Problem-Based Learning (PBL). However, one of the challenges remaining is how to ensure each student in all groups pulls his/her weight in projects. Assessing student participation has always been a sticky subject. Using grading wisely is important. This article lays out several different methods of assessing participation in PBL lessons. Most seem effective, but I’m still wondering if there are better ways.

The Art Of The Explanation: I don’t know if you know anything about Common Craft, but their videos that explain Web 2.0 tools, the economy and even Zombie attacks are wonderful. Lee LeFever has written a book explaining… well… explanations. It’s filled with ideas and practical advice on how to communicate better. The book is on my list for a few folks for the holidays. So what has me thinking are the ideas for communicating our ideas. How can we teach kids to communicate better while using things like social media and asynchronous communication tools?

Google Search Literacy Lesson Plans: Search is an area where students need to improve. Especially in how to do an effective search for information, and then how to vet information once they find it. Google is a starting point for many students, but the shear amount of returned results can be overwhelming. A student’s ability to search effectively can go out the window. To help, Google has developed several lesson plans addressing everything from picking the right search terms, to understanding search results, to narrowing search results and more. Each area comes with a beginner, intermediate and advanced lesson for K12 use. So what has me thinking is, why go down this path anyway? Why are we still not doing a good job of teaching kids where their information comes from, and why are we still not doing a great job of teaching kids good search literacy skills? Seems to me that it is as important as any other subjects kids learn.

That is what I am thinking. What about you?

Steven Anderson is @Web20Classroom on Twitter. Steven is a teacher, an instructional technology integrator, speaker/presenter, and education leader. He will be a regular at Connect Learning Today.

Steven Anderson

Steven Anderson is @Web20Classroom on Twitter. Steven is a teacher, an instructional technology integrator, speaker/presenter, and education leader. He will be a regular at Connect Learning Today.
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