Every school should have a student tech squad

Student Tech Squad

Student Tech SquadOne of the greatest things you can do for your technology program is to start a student tech squad. While this works best with middle and high school students, starting students in a technology club can work with younger students, too.

There are many reasons to have a school tech squad. In many ways, students are practiced technology users who naturally love to share “how to” with younger students, their peers, and with adults—teachers and parents. Many also get a kick out of what makes things work, and fixing stuff. When it comes to technology, fixing things can be a daily practice. While there may be one adult assigned to do fixes in a school or district, it takes time away from other jobs that person may also need to do. Sometimes fixes are simple and repetitive, with quick answers. A student tech squad can be trained to handle small problems that arise, as well as normal, everyday, upkeep necessities, which could include storage and charging procedures. Simple how to and show and tell are possibilities, too. Educators enjoy when students explain technology to their peers—and to them as well.

Offering certification or credits to high school tech squad members can be an incentive. Sometimes technology companies will get involved, and may donate student tech team development incentives. Most districts ask providers about adult professional development, but asking for student tech team development options makes sense for a district and tech provider, as well. Training students beyond their natural tech abilities can be a source of school and student pride.  There is importance for school administrators saying, “We have a trained student tech team.” And today, as a student, being a part of an elite tech team should be worth a varsity letter jacket for sure.

Summary
Article Name
Student Tech Squad
Description
Schools should offer a student tech squad that can be trained to handle small problems that arise, as well as normal, everyday, upkeep necessities, which could include storage and charging procedures.
Author
Ken Royal

Ken Royal is an educator with 34 years of classroom/school and instructional technology teaching experience, as well as a blogger on all things education and education technology. Teaching accomplishments include: 4-time district teacher of the year, Connecticut Middle School Teacher of the Year, as well as Bill and Melinda Gates award for Technology School of Excellence. He is an Education storyteller. Follow @KenRoyal on Twitter.
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